Lecture, “The Great California Shakeout”

On Saturday, September 11, Senior Curator of Geological Sciences Kathleen Springer will present a lecture, “The Great California Shakeout,” at 2pm at the San Bernardino County Museum. This lecture is included in paid museum admission.

Springer will illustrate that our region straddles the mighty San Andreas Fault.  This giant gash that slices through California is the boundary between two of the largest tectonic plates on the planet, which in turn makes our area one of the most geologically active regions in North America.

The ShakeOut scenario, a hypothetical earthquake designed by scientists to show what will happen when a major earthquake strikes southern California, is intended to raise earthquake awareness and to motivate preparedness as well as participation in the “Drop, Cover and Hold On” drill that will occur at 10:21am on October 21, 2010, the day of the Great California ShakeOut, an annual statewide and now annual drill.

The San Bernardino County Museum is at the California Street exit from Interstate 10 in Redlands. The museum is open Tuesdays through Sundays and holiday Mondays from 9am to 5pm. Admission is $8 (adult), $6 (military or senior), $5 (student) and $4 (child aged 5 to 12). Children under five and Museum Association members are admitted free. For more information, visit www.sbcountymuseum.org.

The museum is accessible to persons with disabilities. If assistive listening devices or other auxiliary aids are needed in order to participate in museum exhibits or programs, requests should be made through Museum Visitor Services at least three business days prior to your visit. Visitor Services’ telephone number is 909-307-2669 ext. 229 or (TDD) 909-792-1462.

High School Students Offered SAT Preparation Workshop

The “SAT 1 Preparation Course” fee is $145 per person and includes in-class materials.  Classes will be held on Sat., Sept.  25 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. in Cal State San Bernardino’s Yasuda Center.  The registration deadline is Fri., Sept. 10, 2010.

To register for the class or for more information, please contact Kristen Reagan at (909) 537-3990 or E-mail reagank.csusb.edu.  To receive a free Course Catalog in the mail, call (909) 537-5981 or go tohttp://cel.csusb.edu/request_info.html.

This intensive, two-day preparation workshop offered by Cal State, San Bernardino’s College of Extended Education is designed to give high school students an edge on the newly formatted Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) I Reasoning Test.  SAT scores are an important element used in determining college and university admissions throughout the U.S.  Let an experienced university instructor help your child succeed by enrolling him or her in the “SAT 1 Preparation Course” offered on  September  25.  Workshop topics include a review of the new Writing section (essay and multiple choice questions), the Critical Reading section, and expanded math topics.  All question types will be covered and several short-form practice tests will be given in class to prepare students for actual testing conditions.

SAT Preparation Workshop Offered for Local High School Students

This intensive, two-day preparation workshop offered by Cal State, San Bernardino’s College of Extended Education is designed to give high school students an edge on the newly formatted Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) I Reasoning Test.  SAT scores are an important element used in determining college and university admissions throughout the U.S.  Let an experienced university instructor help your child succeed by enrolling him or her in the “SAT 1 Preparation Course” offered on two Saturdays in September (9/18 and 25).  Workshop topics include a review of the new Writing section (essay and multiple choice questions), the Critical Reading section, and expanded math topics.  All question types will be covered and several short-form practice tests will be given in class to prepare students for actual testing conditions.

The “SAT 1 Preparation Course” fee is $145 per person and includes in-class materials.  Classes will be held on Sat., Sept. 18 and 25 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. in Cal State San Bernardino’s Yasuda Center.  The registration deadline is Fri., Sept. 10. 2011.

To register for the class or for more information, please contact  To receive a free Course Catalog in the mail, call (909) 537-5981 or go to

Music at the Mansion – MMX.IV

Emily Dunn

Sunday, September 12, 2010, 3 PM
Dinner immediately following the Concert
RSVP needed
Call Arts Council at 909 585 5916

The Arts Council of Big Bear Valley is pleased to present “Music at the Mansion – MMX.IV. This is entertainment at its best, with up-close seating, wonderful music, and excellent dining following the show and to top it off with “easy on the pocket” prices.

The entertainment features Emily Dunn, an “up-and-coming” singer and “song-writer” who is recording her first CD of her own music. She has been singing, dancing and acting for over 10 years and she brings to the stage, enthusiasm and vitality to all that she does. She will be singing her own originals “Where Did My Fight Go” and “Won’t You Be Mine” which will be featured on her new CD. This is the time to hear new music and in the not so distant future to say, “I heard her when…”

Nancy Celeste Walker

Another great local entertainer is Nancy Celeste Walker. “Nancy just lights up the stage” is what countless audience members say who have seen her perform. Nancy Celeste Walker has impressed thousands with her captivating vocals from the White House to audiences of musical theater to film scores to the Los Angeles and Orange County music scene. Nancy sang for Bill and Hillary Clinton during the Christmas Holidays thanks to her Mother sending them a copy of her CD.  Nancy states, “singing in the White House has been a highlight of her career”. Nancy has also performed locally with the Big Bear Performing Arts Center with “Divas”; “From Paris, With Love” and last October she did a Cabaret show of “funny songs” called “Isn’t It Funny” to sold out crowds.

Elaine Fitzpatrick, Dr. Tod Fitzpatrick will be singing songs from “Brigadoon,” “South Pacific,” “Showboat,” and an all time favorite “Phantom of the Opera”.  Diane Sloan will be singing “I’ve got a Crush on You” and other pieces. Mike Cross is well known for his style with the keyboard, his fingers  dance over the keys. Lisa Waner will be playing music by Phil Coulter and “Danny Boy” a traditional arrangement by Galway on the flute.

This event is held at the Knickerbocker Mansion at 3 PM Sunday September 12th and following the concert is a special dinner prepared by Chef Thomas, assisted by Robert, sous-chef.  At the previous concerts the dinner guests have raved about the quality of the food and the diverse menu offered.

Ticket prices are Concert Only $20.00 (students $10.00) and Special Dinner Menu – $20.00 (tax and gratuity not included). Seating is definitely limited so reserve early by calling the Arts Council at 909-585-5916.  This is an evening to remember with great music, a gourmet meal and easy prices.

Big Bear Lake Int. Film Festival Announces Screenwriting Finalists

An important component of the Big Bear Lake International Film Festival (BBLIFF) is its screenwriting competition. This is the 9th year that the Festival has given aspiring writers the opportunity to submit entries, receive evaluations of their work and vie for an invitation to participate in the Festival.

Over 200 entries were read and evaluated by a team of readers. Each entry is carefully considered by readers and the five highest rated screenplays are invited to take part as finalists in the Festival. In alphabetical order by title the Finalists are: Brothers by Kirk Weddell of Brighton, United Kingdom; Chances by Jeff Trently of Levittown, Pennsylvania and Anthony Stitt of Los Angeles; Germain’s Prime by L.D. Goffigan of Los Angeles; Season of the Mists by Kevin Brodie of Coventry, Connecticut; and To a Dancing God, by Robert Horvath of Santa Fe, New Mexico.

The top five scripts are currently being read by an eight-member panel of Hollywood professional producers, agents and managers who will select 1st, 2nd and 3rd place winners and 2 honorable mentions. Distinguished judges for the 2010 screenwriting competition are Cari-Esta Albert, producer; Cathy Tarr, story-editor, CAA; D.C. Fontana, award-winning writer; Jennifer Good, agent, The Alpern Group; Ashley Berns, manager, Circle of Confusion; Cary Kozlov, literary agent, Leslie Conliff, manager, Intellectual Property Group; and Chris Soth, writer/consultant, Million Dollar Screenwriting.

The BBLIFF screenwriting competition is unique among film festival screenwriting competitions because each entry receives back written evaluations of their script from a minimum of three different readers. Those that make it to the second round receive evaluations by six readers. Screenwriting Competition Director Sandy Steers points out that, “The majority of competitions do not provide writers with feedback and those that do charge extra for it. We receive thank you notes every year from writers who appreciate the level of assistance this valuable feedback has given them.”

A previous screenwriting competition winner, Iris Yamashita, realized her dream after participating in the BBLIFF competition. Yamashita was nominated for an academy award for best screenplay for the Clint Eastwood movie Letters From Iwo Jima (2006). Yamashita was discovered during the competition by a film festival juror, Catherine Tarr at Creative Artists Agency (CAA). Tarr recommended the screenplay to Paul Haggis and Clint Eastwood who were working on a companion production to “Flags of Our Fathers.” Yamashita later returned to Big Bear to participate as a speaker on the screenwriting panel.

Free GED Program Gives Students A Chance On College

(COLTON, Calif.) High school graduation or completion of a General Equivalency Diploma (GED) is usually a requirement to attend college, but for adults completing this education can be a challenge. Some adult schools have waiting lists of more than 3,000 students.

At Four-D College, students who have left high school without a diploma and now want to study for a career in health care can earn their GED at the same time they begin their college education.

“Four-D College provides a quality education in the health care field,” said CEO and President Linda Smith. “Mastering high school graduation requirements are the only way they will have adequate background to grasp the new concepts they learn here at Four-D College.”

Therefore, at no cost to students enrolled in a career program at Four-D College, students who lack a high school diploma are able to enroll in a special three-month preparation program until they earn their GED. They take this course at the same time as their introductory courses in their career program.

The GED course gave Tiffini Isaacson, 22, of Phelan, the opportunity she needed to train for a career as a medical assistant. After completing the GED course last year, she then completed Four- D College’s Medical Assistant program this summer.

Tiffini had left high school in Henderson, Nev. about five years ago.  Since then, she became a mother, and realized her need for more education.

“I left home because of family problems and just kind of did my own thing for a few years,” she said.  “Then my fiancé lost his job, so we moved to Phelan so we could stay with his grandmother. When we moved, I decided to go back to school.”

Tiffini initially started her medical assistant education at another college. Although she found her lack of a complete high school education didn’t get in the way of academic progress there, she had doubts that her first school would adequately prepare her for her chosen career as a medical assistant.

“Some of the girls I had gone to school with told me they were transferring to Four-D College, so I went there to find out more,” she said. “It was exactly what I needed. They are very strict about homework and testing, and their training in the clinics was much better.”

But, at Four-D College, the higher expectations made high school education an absolute necessity. That is exactly what its GED course offers.

“I provide an overview of high school, covering math, science, language arts, social studies and writing,” said Jonathan Williams, director of continuing education for Four-D College, and instructor of the preparation course taught at both the Colton and Victorville campuses.

Four-D College created the GED preparation program in 2009. Since then it has enrolled 154 students. After completing the preparation, 98 percent pass the GED exam.

“I teach the course at a 10th or 11th grade level,” Williams said. “Some students learn what is necessary in a week or two, others take longer. If they need more help, they can stay with me longer than three months”

Students meet for the course itself three days a week. Any student who feels they need it can also meet with Williams outside of class for tutoring

“Some students did not get very far in high school,” Williams continued. “I have had some students who only went through sixth grade. They realize now they need a lot more education to have success. This gives them a second chance to obtain the skills they need for a career in health care.”

One reason high school students do not graduate is because of learning disabilities, Williams said. Even these students can take college courses and have a career, if they’re given special accommodations, such as additional time to complete coursework or take tests.

Williams not only gives his students the time they need to finish the preparation program, he helps those with learning disabilities qualify for special accommodations when they take the GED exam.

“With them, it just takes a little longer,” he said. “We don’t turn away anyone from the GED program.”

Four-D College provides education in the growing health care field at locations in Colton and Victorville. Four-D College offers programs in vocational nursing, medical assistant, medical billing and coding, dental assistant, massage therapy and pharmacy technician.

New courses begin monthly at Four-D College and courses are available in the morning, afternoon and evening to meet the needs of working adults. For more information or a tour, call (800) 600-5422 or go to www.4DCollege.com .

Viewing the Gibbous Moon

Come to the San Bernardino County Museum in Redlands to enjoy beautiful views of the waxing gibbous moon through the telescopes of the San Bernardino Valley Amateur Astronomers on Saturday, September 18, from 7:30 to 9:30pm. This event is free to public.

About three-quarters of the moon will be visible, and visitors will be able to see the day/night shadow and the surface features vividly.

“As a bonus, two bright planets will grace the sky,” said Chris Clarke, program coordinator. “Gleaming bright in the eastern sky will be Jupiter. Its four largest moons, the famed ‘Galilean Satellites,’ will be easily spotted, along with the colorful belts and bands of its outer atmosphere. A brilliant crescent-shaped Venus will also appear low in the southwest. Families can see and learn about telescopes by comparing the views through all the different types and sizes of instruments available. They can also chat with the owners. Above all, it’s simply just fun!”

The San Bernardino County Museum is at the California Street exit from Interstate 10 in Redlands. Parking is free. For more information, visitwww.sbcountymuseum.org.

The San Bernardino County Museum is accessible to persons with disabilities. If assistive listening devices or other auxiliary aids are needed in order to participate in museum exhibits or programs, request should be made through Museum Visitors Services at least three business days prior to your visit. Visitor Services’ telephone number is (909) 307-2669 ext. 229 or TDD (909) 792-1462.

Skygone Cloud Powers Open Source Web Mapping Suite – OpenGeo Cloud Edition

Redlands, CA – Skygone Inc., a leader in geospatial cloud computing, today announces the launch of OpenGeo Cloud Edition; the first fully-supported, open source web-mapping software suite delivered to users via cloud computing.

OpenGeo Cloud Edition consists of proven open source geospatial technology including of PostGIS, GeoServer, OpenLayers and GeoExt; configured, optimized, and deployed to customers on Skygone Cloud as a monthly, pay-as-you-go subscription.  The affordable monthly fee includes software, technical support, unlimited bug fixes, and IT infrastructure; including, a cloud server instance, data storage, and bandwidth provided by the geo-savvy IT experts at Skygone.

“Our mission is to make geospatial information more open – publicly available and accessible on compelling platforms that people want.  We are thrilled with the cloud computing power and flexibility Skygone allows us to offer our clients,” said Chris Holmes, President of OpenGeo. “OpenGeo Cloud Edition is a natural extension of the extensive work we’ve performed on installers, and is the next step in making it as easy as possible for people to get started with a supported open source geospatial stack.”

With the ever growing need for on-demand access to enterprise-class geospatial software, Skygone and OpenGeo have created three deployment options for OpenGeo Suite Cloud Edition; including:  Community, Enterprise, and Auto-Scaling, which allow end-users to choose the level of service they require to manage and deliver their geospatial data.

“We are proud to team with OpenGeo to provide the first fully-supported cloud deployment of a complete open source web mapping platform,” said Ryan Hughes, CEO of Skygone.  “Skygone’s cloud computing capabilities combined with OpenGeo’s amazing support, dashboards access, and unlimited bug fixes means enterprise GIS users finally have a turnkey, fully-supported, open source solution that can be deployed on-demand to meet their web mapping needs.”

For more information, pricing, or to deploy on-demand, visit Skygone’s App Store featuring geospatial technology on the Cloud: www.theGISmarketplace.com.

About Skygone:

Skygone, Inc. powers geospatial enterprises with cloud computing.  We enable our organizations to implement leading-edge, enterprise-class solutions, quickly and efficiently by leveraging the Cloud.  In addition to operating “theGISmarketplace.com”, Skygone’s depth and experience with Geospatial Technology, Cloud Computing, Software-as-a-Service (SaaS), Virtualization, Green Technologies, and Data Center Consolidation services has made Skygone the go-to service provider for organizations around the globe.  Contact Skygone at: www.skygoneinc.com; 1-888-SKY-GIS1; Twitter: @Skygone.

About OpenGeo:

OpenGeo is a social enterprise working to build the best web-based geospatial technology. The company brings the best practices of open source software to geospatial organizations around the world by providing enterprises with supported, tested, and integrated open source solutions to build the Geospatial Web. OpenGeo also supports open source communities by employing key developers of PostGIS, GeoServer, and OpenLayers. The company has a seven year history of providing successful consulting services and products to clients like Google, Tri-Met, Landgate, and the Open Geospatial Consortium. OpenGeo is the geospatial division of OpenPlans, a New York-based 501(c)(3) non-profit which informs and engages communities through journalism and open source software.

Replacing Original Window Sash Balances

Acme Duplex(tm) Sash Balance

Today, people appreciate the craftsmanship and quality of original wood sash windows. Gone are the days of simply ripping out beautiful old wood windows and replacing them with aluminum or plastic windows. In fact, many communities require maintenance or replacement of original windows in older neighborhoods, in order to maintain the ambience of the streetscape.

Wood has always been a superior insulator against changing outside temperatures, but glass is not. Therefore, many are refitting old windows with new sashes or double-pane glass to decrease the heat loss in winter, and keep the heat out during the summer. Sunscreen for glass is also available today.

One alteration that is often overlooked when windows are refitted is the process of adjusting the weights to “carry” the increased weight of the new sash glass. Undersizing the balance can cause injury, if the sash falls onto an unsuspecting hand.

For hundreds of years (up to the 1960’s) sash windows were popular, because without air conditioning, opening the top and the bottom sashes provided a convection air-flow that brought cooler air in through the bottom, while allowing warmer air to escape at the top.  Today, with high-energy costs, this principle still works in areas where the evening air cools, compared to the daily high temperatures. This practical application, along with the resurgence of home designs that duplicate our older classic homes, has been responsible for the resurgence in popularity of the double-hung window

Repairing or resizing double hung balances

Prior to the 1920’s, homes generally used pulley and weight systems to balance the window sash. The weight was typically lead or brick, and was slightly heavier than the sash. Old cotton ropes, with plenty of use, might need to be replaced every twenty years or so. The cotton rope was attached to the weight behind the window frame molding, and was fed up through a pulley in the frame, then back down to the window.

To repair the ropes, some windows have a slot to get access to the weight. If no access slot was provided, the interior (or exterior in some cases) window molding must be removed to gain access to the weight.

Using a sharp knife or razor, cut the paint along the seams of the molding to prevent further paint damage. Carefully remove the molding on both sides. Access the space in the wall where the weight is and retrieve it.

Cut the old rope from the weight and window sash and remove it, taking care to notice how the weight was attached to the rope. Note: Some knots should be duplicated, and some have another pulley on the weight with the rope attachment in another place.

Replace the rope with a very similar thickness of rope (using a different weight of rope can cause the rope to jump the pulley). However, rope with nylon blend may not need to be replaced as often, so shop for rope that looks the same, as the old rope but has more strength due to new material development.

Replace the moldings, fill cracks and paint. You will probably not need to do this again in your lifetime.

Replace with an ACME® side mortise sash balance (also called a tape balance)

If you do not like this approach, another solution was developed to replace the pulley. This is called the mortise or tape balance. Mortise retractable spring balances use a strip of metal that is wound tightly into a contained unit. ACME® side mortise balances many times fit in the same hole left by the rope pulley in the window frame. The weight is no longer needed, so can be left in the wall, meaning you don’t have to remove and paint the window casing or trim.[i]

First, remove the sash and weigh it. Select the proper ACME® mortise weight size, and add a few pounds for safety (see sizing charts). Each side carries half of the weight, so divide the weight by two to get the weight for each balance. Remove the pulley from the mortised slot in the window frame. Compare the ACME® mortise with the slot, remove any additional material with a hammer and chisel or drill and bit. See video for an example.

When the ACME® mortise balances are securely fit and screwed to the frame, pull the tape out of one side and attach the tape to the window with the included hook. Take extreme care not to “snap” or let go of the tape as it may damage the internal spring. Do the same with the other side. Set the sash in the window and replace stop molding and touch-up paint.

The ACME® double-hung window spring mortise balance will provide many decades of service, and preserve the look and feel of your historic windows.

Acme Duplex™ Corporation – Makes there products in the U.S.A., in San Bernardino, California.


[i]Note: some choose to insulate this area when it has been vacated; however, this require removing internal or external window casing or trim.


This is a “Story Telling Media – Advertorial” – Content provided by Acme Duplex.

Disaster Recovery Critical For Businesses

How quickly can your business be up and running after a disaster? Will it be open at all? A natural catastrophe (e.g., earthquake), power outage, storeroom flood or any number of unanticipated business interruptions could mean big trouble for your company’s bottom line and competitive advantage. http://www.rcrda.us/CivicAlerts.aspx?AID=158

Learn how to help your small to mid-sized business reduce the potential for loss, and find out how you can prepare in advance to reopen quickly should you be forced to close.

The Business Disaster Recovery Workshop, which is presented by the City of Rancho Cucamonga Emergency Management Program and the Rancho Cucamonga Redevelopment Agency, will provide attendees with information on the steps that can be taken to protect businesses and their employees before, during and after a disaster.

The workshop will also show business owners how to find accurate information during an emergency; protect critical company resources; develop a “business continuity plan” and access financial assistance that may be available for businesses after an emergency.

Workshop attendees will receive materials and resources to help their businesses prepare, and professional instruction from a representative of the City’s Emergency Management Program. The Business Disaster Recovery Workshop is free, but registration is required.

Businesses interested in attending may register online (www.RCRDA.us/workshop), or at the link below. Registration closes September 27th.